Archive for February, 2010

February 22, 2010

February 22, 2010

Tristan Glados Del Carpio

February 22, 2010

I didn’t actually like this image very much at first, but it’s really grown on me – I think because of the effective simplicity in the color choices which, oddly, I think is what put me off of it in the first place… I’m not that fond of the pea-green shade. Once I learned that it was created with the intent of advertisement, however, my whole viewpoint on it changed, and I realized that the use of green was intended to convey a sense of envy in the figure. The object of desire is the red shoe which, in addition in working to effectively contrast with the green background, is evocative of sexual power, especially when combined with a stiletto heel and snakeskin print. The figure’s lips are the only other element which stand out, highlighted in pink.. this is similar to the previous image I looked at, acting as a symbol of beauty. Both the lips and the shoe are the only places in the image that white is used; this help to further separate them from the background, and establishes them as the most important elements; the figure is secondary.

Kime Buzzelli

February 21, 2010

The above image, by Kime Buzzelli, caught my eye because of the incorporation of text, which draws attention to the use of the mouth as sexual appeal. This is further enforced by the way the lips on the figure are drawn – they are disproportionately large, a quality which is enhanced by the use of a single bold color to draw attention to them. The figure herself is aware of the sexual associations made with lips, and is actively drawing attention to them herself, in order to gain male attention. The result is an image which immediately calls to mind vaginal penetration… and reminded me of this photograph by Roger Parry in a book I’ve got on fetish and surrealism:

Also, not quite as interesting probably, but I like the subtle use of colors, and especially the fact that the figure’s lips are the same color as her shirt… it makes a connection between fashion and sexual appeal. I also really like the flesh-toned paper it’s drawn on.

Richard Gray

February 21, 2010

I love the title of this image, “Plans for a Woman,” and all the symbolism incorporated into it. The spine of the snake along the bottom of the image eventually forming the lacing along the back of the figure’s corset, which bears a certain resemblance to armor. The fruit at the lower left corner is obviously indicative of female genitalia, and the sprout coming from it is a visual metapohr for “giving life,” which is then further emphasized by the presence of similar plants framing the rest of the image, which also call to mind the traditional connection in art between women and nature.

Sara Singh

February 21, 2010

These images are some of the most visually appealing to me in Fashion Illustration Next. I love the use of colored line to form the outline of the figures, as opposed to the typical black… it helps set the tone of the image, and also serves to incorporate the model further into the fashion itself – the fact that their skin is depicted as white, like the background, helps to enforce this.. On a similar note, I think that the use of one color theme per image provides a very interesting tone, and immediately indicates the mood that Singh wants to convey.

Sophie Toulouse

February 20, 2010

For the purpose of research for the project, I’ve bought Fashion Illustration Next by Laird Borrelli, which has been on my “to buy” list for a while now anyway.

I love this image; it immediately grabbed my attention as I was flicking through the book, due in large part to the stark black-on-white contrast used, as well as the subject matter. The foot and leg focus, presence of stiletto heels, and animal print all convey an idea of sexuality, but I haven’t quite figured out how I ought to interpret it yet. The nondescript, simplistic legs could serve as a backdrop for the shoes – is the figure only present to display an item of clothing? The fact that nothing above the knees is shown to exist eliminates the importance of any personality or identity of the figure, effectively making the legs and feet themselves into objects with the single purpose of being viewed. Conversely, though, there is a certain boldness about the legs – both in the use of the contrasting black, and in the strong brushstrokes that seem to have been used to form them. Although there is still no personality or defining characteristic to be found, this could be seen to be at least indicative of a strongĀ presence, if nothing else. Additionally, the stiletto heel is often seen as a symbol of sexual power or control… honestly I’m having a hard time coming to a conclusion here; these are just some thoughts I’ve had on the image.

The second one here did not strike me as much as the first, but I’ve mentioned it here simply because of the figures’ eyes, which are blacked out… this makes the importance of the “models” secondary to the display of the clothing and, again, takes away a sense of personality or identity.

Narrative Research – Julie Verhoeven

February 20, 2010

I’ve decided to look at different fashion illustrators.. I think it’s a good place for me to start my research, because I’m focusing my project around societal views on female perfection, especially in the physical sense. Julie Verhoeven has been one of my favorite artists for a while, so I’ve begun with her work.

This image is from Julie Verhoeven’s Fat Bottomed Girls, titled “Television Personalities: Part Time Punk.” Aside from her characteristic, seemingly spontaneous application of bright, bold colors, one of the first things I noticed about this image was the presence of the bra next to the figure. This immediately causes the viewer’s perceptions of the figure to change – it is no longer a simple nude, but is explicitly in a state of undress. In relation to this, the breasts are highlighted through the use of thick black paint, contrasting with the otherwise thin pen lines that define the rest of the body. The attention drawn to the figure’s sexual attributes then leads the viewer to notice its clearly drawn Adam’s apple, which then causes the breasts to be viewed in a completely new light – the viewer is made to question the figure’s gender and sexual identity.